Baby Names based on Architecture

I was driving home from work with my son in the back seat when I began to daydream about the weather. We had over two feet of snow over the weekend, which diminished my urge to venture outdoors (in single-digit temps, nonetheless). Still, it was beautiful. Everything looked like a Bob Ross original. The snowdrifts along the roads, the bending white trees, and glassy covered houses.

As I passed one of the newer subdivisions in my town, I was reminded of a name I read in a baby book (specifically for abstract names): Balcony. When I first read it, I laughed, but then I started to like the way it sounded.

Balcony.

As I continued my drive, I started to think of other parts of houses or buildings that could be used as baby names (ones that were not all that common as the word “doorknob”). And thus, this topic for a post was born.

Although I started this with the intent to have an A-Z list, I couldn’t find any terms for four letters (U, X, Y, and Z). Still, I really liked the ones I came across.

I should also note that I am NOT an architect by any means, and that all of the terms have been found scouring the web. (Apologies if I screwed something up!) The following terms are just the ones that I found to sound… well, baby-name-worthy.

Masonry or large cut stone used as facing
Space between architectural elements
Inner part of a Greek or Roman temple
Window that projects from a slanted roof
Part of the roof that hangs over the walls
A vertical band under the roof
Triangular part of a wall between intersecting roof pitches
Dome shaped dwelling, traditionally Navajo
A Slavic log house
Small pier
Tool used to lock doors and other items
Addition to the rear of a house
A type of tower
Upright post at the foot of a stairwell
Form of protruding bay window
A structure built on supports
Masonry bricks placed at corners of walls
A carved or molded design in the shape of a rose
Paned windows
Windows divided into sections by stone bars or moulding
A roofed porch usually enclosed with a railing
11th century castle, Windsor Castle

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